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Posts Tagged ‘waste management’

Breaking the global paralysis on endocrine disruptors

November 10, 2011 Leave a comment

By Baskut Tuncak

Over the past two decades, the urgent need for global action on endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has become undeniable.   A little-known global agreement—SAICM—might provide the best opportunity for global action to prevent further health and environmental harm from EDCs.

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Global negotiation on chemicals offer hope for developing countries…and the world

November 4, 2011 1 comment

By David Azoulay

David Azoulay, Senior Attorney

Hundreds of government delegates will join representatives of intergovernmental organizations, health and environmental advocates, as well as business groups in Belgrade, Serbia November 15-18 to improve the management of toxic chemicals. The Belgrade meeting, known as an Open-Ended Working Group (OEWG), sets the stage for the Third International Conference on Chemicals Management (ICCM3) in September 2013.

Both events are part of the Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM), a broad global agreement to improve policies and practices. Next year will mark the 50th Anniversary Read more…

Multilateralism works! An insider’s analysis of Basel COP10

October 26, 2011 Leave a comment

By Hana Heineken, Law Fellow

My very first COP experience, the 10th Conference of the Parties to the Basel Convention in Cartagena, Colombia, was hailed by delegates, observers, and the UNEP Executive Director Achim Steiner as the most successful Basel COP in the history of the Basel Convention.  I was fortunate to have joined CIEL’s delegation that participated in such a momentous event.

COP10 began with Read more…

Basel COP10: Shipbreaking, E-Waste, and Global Waste Management

October 13, 2011 Leave a comment

Laura Drummond, Law Fellow

By Laura Drummond, Law Fellow

The Tenth Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Basel Convention (COP10) will be held in Cartagena de Indias, Colombia from October 17-21, 2011. Adopted in 1989, the Basel Convention now boasts 178 State Parties. The overall objective of the treaty is to protect human health and the environment from the adverse effects of hazardous wastes.   In order to achieve this, the Convention requires Parties to limit the transboundary movement of waste, and only allows the export of waste with the prior informed consent of the importing state.  The theme of COP10 is “Prevention, minimization and recovery of wastes.” COP10 will be particularly important in determining the future of the Convention. Read more…

Multilateral Environmental Agreements and You

July 15, 2011 Leave a comment

Mary Tharin, CIEL Intern

By Mary Tharin

BASEL, CITES, CBD, CMS? Remembering the acronyms of Multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEAs) is challenging enough, much less trying to recall their technical details. Thankfully, the MEA Information and Knowledge Management Initiative, facilitated by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP), just launched a user-friendly information portal called InforMEA to help navigate the complex landscape of international environmental law. CIEL’s attorneys and interns helped to assemble, analyze and index international environmental treaties and decisions for this Initiative.

The website presents major MEAs and protocols in three over-arching categories: 1) biological diversity, 2) chemicals and waste management, and 3) climate, atmosphere and deserts. With a few easy clicks you can access the full text of each agreement, a list of parties, national focal points, and subsequent decisions. The site also features a useful chart listing every country to ever sign an MEA, along with their date of ratification. It’s interesting to note how some countries (like the United States) compare with the rest of the world.

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The Ocean is not a Waste Dump!

May 2, 2011 1 comment

Hana Heineken, Law Fellow

The ocean is vital to the survival of all life on this planet: it is the source of our rainfall, it regulates are climate, it provides us with food, and it serves as the home of countless marine animals. I think we can all agree that the ocean is fundamental to our enjoyment of life. Unfortunately, industrialization has produced massive amounts of garbage, and countries have been struggling for decades to properly manage the waste. People’s backyards and the ocean itself have become waste dumps.

In 1989, countries signed the Basel Convention and agreed to protect human health and the environment against the adverse effects of generating and managing hazardous wastes. The Convention was in response to the outflow of hazardous wastes from developed countries to developing countries, caused by polluters seeking to lessen the costs of proper waste management. State Parties to the Basel Convention and the Basel Convention Secretariat have been  improving waste management practices around the world, particularly in developing countries, but new waste streams have created new challenges.

Among these new waste streams is shipbreaking. Read more…